Ask the Butcher Tips

Ask the Butcher

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  • What’s the Beef?

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    The key factor in preparing excellent beef is choosing the right cut of meat for the job. “Tougher” cuts of meat come from harder working areas of the cow – areas where the muscles are used more, like the shoulder … Continue reading

  • Steak Side

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    For the perfect steak to grill or saute, consider cuts like bone-in rib eye, New York strip or porterhouse (often enough for two people). These cuts are tender, but also flavorful and “meaty”. All they need is a drizzle of … Continue reading

  • Sustainably Selective

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    Seafood lovers now have a reliable source to keep them informed about issues like mercury levels in fish and how to purchase fish that supports responsible stewardship of the world’s oceans. “Seafood Watch” from the Monterey Bay Aquarium provides this … Continue reading

  • This Little Pig

    Filed in Ask the Butcher

    Similar to beef, the first thing to consider when buying pork is how it will be cooked. Different cuts of pork are suited to different cooking methods. Cuts from the shoulder (which, curiously, include Boston butt) are well suited to … Continue reading

  • Hamming It Up

    Filed in Ask the Butcher

    Ham comes from the leg of the pig, and is either wet-cured or dry-cured. Most wet-cured ham is either injected with or immersed in a brine. Brines contain water, salt, sugar and other flavorings, and the length of curing/brining affects … Continue reading

  • Frozen Birds

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    Thawing a frozen chicken or turkey in the refrigerator can take about 5 hours per pound – this can add up to days in the refrigerator for larger birds. To speed up the thawing process, a frozen bird may be … Continue reading

  • Crispy Skin

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    To ensure crispy golden skin on roasted chicken, dry the chicken completely before seasoning it with salt and roasting at about 400 degrees.

  • Sizing It Up

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    Lamb sold in the United States is sourced primarily from the United States, Australia and New Zealand. There are four grades of lamb, Prime, Choice, Good and Utility. Choice is the grade most widely available, and is considered very good … Continue reading

  • Seasoning for Success

    Filed in Ask the Butcher

    Classic seasonings for lamb include rosemary, garlic, lemon, olive oil and mint. They’re classics for a reason – they all go beautifully with lamb – but don’t be afraid to experiment with new flavors and create your own classic flavor … Continue reading

1 - 9 of 9 Results