Course
61 - 72 of 562 Results
61 - 72 of 562
Course
  • Apricot Rugelach

    The dough for this traditional Jewish cookie or pastry (it fits the bill as both) is rich and soft and must be made a day ahead and refrigerated before rolling out. We’ve filled these with apricot jam—but seedless raspberry, peach, strawberry and currant jellies are also wonderful. Rugelach freezes well and thaws quickly, which means it is well worth keeping on hand. But be warned: it is best to hide them in the back of the freezer, lest they disappear.

  • Lemon Dry Brined Turkey with Sage

    Nearly every bit of advice out there for roasting a turkey recommends brining the bird overnight to ensure that it is moist and tender. One of my favorite alternatives to having a giant ziplock bag of salty water in the fridge is the dry brine! An easy sprinkle of salt over the turkey is all you need for moist and tender meat. As an added bonus there’s not the struggle with the lifting the bird out of a giant bag of water. The resulting roasted turkey also has a super crispy crackling skin! I’ve add a touch of lemon zest to the salt brine to give it a little dimension. Overnight time is recommended for a wet brine (you don’t want to overbrine it) but with a dry brine, 2 or 3 days is perfectly fine and in fact, the longer you dry brine, the crisper the skin.

  • Blackened Green Beans

    While “blackening” was a traditional New Orleans method of cooking spice-rubbed foods over very high heat, with the right seasoning blend, you can get equally good result over medium high heat. The idea is to slightly scorch, or blacken, the surface of the food to give it a deep, rich, savory flavor.

  • Turkey Meatballs in Cranberry BBQ Sauce

    The combination of turkey and cranberries are obvious to anyone that has sat down for a Thanksgiving meal. But the tart tangy cranberries also work well in a bright and colorful BBQ sauce base for turkey meatballs. This crowd-pleasing appetizer is an excellent addition to any holiday buffet or party. Feel free to use fresh or frozen cranberries for this recipe. And if you can find it, try to use ground turkey thigh meat as it is more tender and juicy.

  • Maple Sweet Potato Casserole

    The traditional sweet potato casserole with sticky sweet marshmallows on top is a classic favorite at Thanksgiving dinner tables. This re-imagined version brings it to a whole new level with a pecan crumble for texture as well as a sweet and fluffy brown sugar meringue piped on top. If you don’t like your sweet potato casserole candy sweet, just skip the meringue topping and bake it with the pecan crumble alone.

  • Belgian Endive Gratin with Prosciutto

    Belgian endive, individually wrapped with thin slices of prosciutto, napped with a rich béchamel sauce, and then topped with grated Gruyere cheese is one of my favorite main dishes at any time of year.

  • Jam Dot Power Muffins

    Whole wheat flour, oats, seeds and fruit make these hearty but light muffins perfect for a grab-and-go breakfast or an anytime snack.

  • Korean Reuben Sandwiches

    Korean-flavored beef and kimchee update this classic pub favorite. Can’t find kimchee? Substitute sriracha-flavored sauerkraut instead.

  • Veal Osso Buco

    Veal Osso Buco is the perfect cold weather dish. It’s rich and hearty and filled with tomatoes, vegetables and a splash of dry white wine. Perfect when served next to buttery mashed potatoes.

  • Deep Fried Artichoke Hearts with Lemon-Caper Basil Sauce

    Be sure to buy frozen artichoke hearts with no seasoning (other than salt). To make these a couple of hours in advance, allow them to cool in a single un-crowded layer on a rack. To reheat and crisp, place an oiled sheet pan in a 350° oven and let it get hot; add the artichokes in a single un-crowded layer and heat.

  • Creamy Polenta with Aged Cheddar Cheese

    Vary the cheese to suit the entrée with which you serve this creamy, rich .

  • Chocolate Peanut Butter Tart

    This is the kind of luscious, decadent, irresistible dessert that has been known to bring the strongest men and women to their knees; that you may dream and day dream about weeks after you’ve had the last crumb of it; that scoffs at the understatement of the word “delicious”. But don’t take our word for it: try it and tell us what word or words you think best describes this Chocolate peanut Butter tart!